This is why you should never refill your plastic water bottle

Most of us don’t think twice about refilling our plastic water bottles. After all, it’s all in the name of personal hydration and it’s eco-friendly! And there’s absolutely nothing harmful about a simple bottle of water, right?

Wrong! That plastic water bottle could actually do your body more harm than good, experts say. Why? You can thank Bisphenol A (commonly known as BPA), a chemical used to manufacture plastics, for your water woes. This harmful chemical can leach into the water and quickly grow dangerous bacteria in the bottle’s cracks—that’s one of the reasons you should stay away from straws, too—and the health consequences are pretty serious.

We spoke to Kent Atherton, CEO of PuriBloc technology, about the risks of reusing plastics. “Sadly, many people buying plastic water bottles do so because they believe they are making a healthy choice when the opposite is more likely to be true,” said Atherton. “Even BPA free products are not safe since manufacturers are now substituting other estrogenic chemicals, not as widely known, which may pose the same danger to human health. ”

5 PHOTOS5 reasons you should never drink out of a plastic water bottleSee Gallery5 reasons you should never drink out of a plastic water bottle

They can release harmful chemicals into your water

Plastics are made to withstand a variety of temperatures — but at a cost. The hotter the bottle gets, the more potential there is to release chemicals known to cause diseases like cancer, especially if you use them over and over again. 

(Getty)

Chemicals in the plastic may make having a baby more difficult

Those same chemicals in the plastic, like BPA, could make having a baby more difficult by affecting fertility. Researchers found that men and women undergoing in-vitro fertilization who had high levels of BPA in their blood, urine, and work environment were less likely to have a successful pregnancy. This is according to a 2013 review of 91 studies published in Reproductive Toxicology. 

(Getty)

It could raise your risk of heart disease and other circulatory issues

Humans exposed to the highest levels of BPA have an increased risk of heart disease, according to a 2012 study published in Circulation. Researchers think this could be due to BPA’s link to high blood pressure. 

(Getty)

Refilling plastic bottles may expose you to harmful bacteria 

Both reusable and disposal plastic bottles break down from regular use over time, meaning that even teeny cracks can welcome in bacteria, according to an article published in journal Practical Gastroenterology. And while most bacteria is usually harmless, bottles can harbor norovirus-, cold-, and flu-causing bacteria. And while usually we’d advise you to wash with hot water and soap, that could cause the plastic to break down even more!

(Getty)

They’re awful for the environment (Duh!)

Many of the bottles are still ending up in the garbage even after they are recycled once. The solution? At home filters. Or bottles made of steel, aluminum or polycarbonate because as they say it’s better to be safe than sorry. 

(Getty)

See Gallery

These estrogenic chemicals can have a negative effect on human beings’ hormonal balances, but the potential dangers of plastic water bottles don’t stop there. In a study of 259 plastic water bottles at the State University of New York at Fredonia, scientists found that 93% of the surveyed bottles had some form of microplastic contamination. Additionally, single-use plastic bottles are mostly made of polyethylene terephthalate, or PET, which is safe to use, but not reuse; these plastics can leach chemicals into your water if heated or scratched.

There’s also the bacterial factor to consider. “The thing about water bottles is that, like all beverage containers, they come into contact with our mouth and hands—which are home to a lot of germs,” says Professor Stephanie Liberatore in the academic journal The Science Teacher. “Their openings are small, which makes them difficult to clean. This, combined with their moist environment, can make water bottles a bacterial breeding ground.”

Try these reusable water bottles instead

  • Buy It

    Tal Blush, 24 Ounce Ranger Sport Water Bottle

    Buy It

  • Buy It

    The Pioneer Woman, 24 Ounce Heritage Floral Tumbler

    Buy It

  • Buy It

    Cupture Crystal Click & Seal Shake Tumbler

    Buy It

  • Buy It

    Boston Warehouse Insulated Water Bottle, 22oz

    Buy It

  • Buy It

    Simple Modern Straw Lid Tumbler

    Buy It

  • Buy It

    Tal Stainless Steel 17 Ounce Water Bottle

    Buy It

  • Buy It

    Mainstays™ 17 fl. oz. Sports Bottle

    Buy It

To hydrate without harm, smart drinkers should avoid re-using disposable bottles. Instead, you should recycle them after drinking up once; or, better yet, invest in a BPA-free plastic bottle or one made from glass or stainless steel. Not only will doing so benefit your health, but you can help the environment, too. If you need another reason to pass on the plastic, here’s the scary reason why water bottles have an expiration date.

Every product is independently selected by our editors. If you buy something through our links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

The post This Is Why You Should Never Refill Your Plastic Water Bottle appeared first on Reader’s Digest.

15 PHOTOS15 hygiene habits that are way worse than you thoughtSee Gallery15 hygiene habits that are way worse than you thought

Irregular brushing or flossing your teeth

What would happen if you abandoned your toothbrush and dental floss? “You would first experience swollen, bleeding gums, bad breath, and [you] may develop cavities,” says Natasha Lee, DDS, president of the California Dental Association. Untreated cavities would travel to the nerve, requiring root canals, and debris in your mouth would lead to gum disease, a painless condition that eventually causes your teeth to fall out.

And it gets worse. “There is a growing amount of research that indicates an association between gum disease and other health problems like heart disease and diabetes,” notes Lee. Try these 10 oral hygiene habits for white teeth.

(Getty)

Rarely showering or bathing

“Personal hygiene serves a more important purpose than just keeping body odor at bay,” says skin care expert Janine Frances, CME, LMT. It’s not just gross, in other words: Soap and water can prevent acne, rashes, and life-threatening infections. “Bacteria grows rapidly on the body, and when it has lots of dead skin cells to feed off of, bacteria on your skin can cause, itching, irritation, and inflammation,” says Frances. “If you already have a skin condition, such as eczema, not showering regularly can make it worse.”

Eventually, a condition called dermatitis neglecta would set in if you stop showering completely, says Frances. You’ll notice thick patches of brown plaque on the skin, and they can lead to secondary infections. Luckily, dermatitis neglecta is usually treatable with regular washing. In severe cases, topical medication might be needed to break down the plaque.

(Getty)

Going to bed with makeup on

At the end of a long, exhausting day, it might be tempting to nod off without washing off your makeup. Any makeup artist or skin care professional will tell you this is one of the most egregious hygiene mistakes you can make. “Not washing your face daily can create clogged pores which can not only lead to blackheads and pimples but uneven skin color due to overgrowth of skin cells,” notes Frances. And that’s not all: Neglecting to wash off your mascara, eyeliner, and other eye makeup can do serious damage to your eyes. Makeup harbors bacteria, which can migrate under your eyelids and lead to styes, inflamed follicles on the lash line, and serious skin infections. Untreated, these infections could eventually lead to blindness. Don’t miss these sleep hygiene tips for a good night’s rest.

(Getty)

Infrequently washing your bedding

Laundry is a chore some people try to avoid like the plague—but if you actually do, you’re asking for trouble. And this doesn’t just apply to clothes; bed sheets that haven’t been washed in months (or longer) become a petri dish of bacteria, fungus, dust mites, and more—and it’s going to get worse exponentially, as “bacteria multiply rapidly,” says Frances. In the worst-case scenario, unwashed bed sheets—and pajamas and clothing for that matter—will lead to a staph infection. If a staph infection makes its way into the bloodstream, it can escalate to a more severe condition like septicemia or toxic shock syndrome—which could be fatal.

(Getty)

Leaving your contact lenses in for days

One of the poorest hygiene habits that ophthalmologist and eye surgeon Alan Mendelsohn, MD, has ever seen is the overwearing of contact lenses that are never cleaned properly—or at all. “Wearing a contact lens for a week or longer duration results in an exponential increase in severe eye infections, including corneal ulcers,” says Dr. Mendelsohn, who equates this habit to wearing the same dirty underwear every day.

If the term “corneal ulcer” makes you cringe, it’s for good reason. A corneal ulcer is actually an open sore on the cornea that causes pain, redness, discharge, and blurry vision. Most corneal ulcers can be treated with antibacterial, antifungal, or antiviral eye drops, but in some cases, a cornea transplant is necessary. Don’t miss which personal hygiene habits that you can skip—and some you really shouldn’t.

(Getty)

Not washing your bras or underwear regularly

You’re courting yeast infections, thrush, and urinary tract infections. Untreated, urinary tract infections can travel to the kidneys and cause sepsis, which can be life-threatening; thrush and yeast infections can cause infertility and internal scarring.

And then there are bras, which most people don’t wash after every wear. Like any unwashed clothes, dirty bras trap oils and bacteria, which will eventually cause acne, rashes, and worse.

(Getty)

Sharing your toothbrush, razor or hairbrush

Sometimes it’s a good thing to be selfish—and personal grooming products are a perfect example of a scenario in which sharing is not necessarily virtuous. For instance, poor oral hygiene habits are bad enough—you certainly don’t need the bacteria from someone else’s mouth infecting yours. And the spread of infections is precisely what can happen if you use someone else’s toothbrush, says the American Dental Association. The consequences of oral infections range from gum disease to potentially fatal conditions like heart disease and diabetes.

And sharing razors isn’t much better, as it can not only spread skin infections like staph, but the practice can transmit viruses like hepatitis and HIV. Sharing hair brushes can put you at risk for lice and skin rashes. Here are 37 “healthy” things you can stop doing right now.

(Getty)

Reusing towels

It’s common to reuse the same towel after a few showers before tossing it in the laundry. But towels that have been used more than a few times—or have been used once at the gym—should be laundered right away. And they certainly shouldn’t be shared, as they can easily harbor bacteria and bodily secretions.

Sharing sweaty towels is an excellent way to spread dangerous skin conditions and infections, like staph, which can be fatal. Need more reasons not to share towels? How about warts and scabies—or more serious conditions like meningitis, hepatitis, and sexually transmitted infections like chlamydia? Chlamydia is a highly curable condition but left untreated it can cause pelvic inflammatory disease and even infertility.

(Getty)

Walking barefoot in public showers

They make flip-flops and water shoes for a reason: When sweat, hair, and urine collect on shower floors, they can breed bacteria, fungus, and mold. Walking barefoot is a great way to pick up ringworm, athlete’s foot, and nail fungus, to name a few notoriously difficult-to-treat conditions.

Ringworm, a fungal infection of the skin, responds well to topical antifungals; however, athlete’s foot can be far more persistent. In the worst-case scenario, athlete’s foot can cause a secondary infection that can lead to fevers and complications of the lymphatic system. Getting a toenail fungus infection means you’ll be losing your nails on a regular basis—and it’s tough to beat: Not even oral antifungals meds can reliably cure the condition, which will eventually cause permanent deformity of nails and nail beds. In extreme cases, nails infected with fungus need to be permanently removed. Know the 10 hygiene mistakes that is making your kids sick.

(Getty)

Reusing a water bottle without washing it

Staying hydrated is important, but refilling your disposable plastic water bottle too often or refilling your reusable bottle without washing it thoroughly could be as unhygienic as licking on your dog’s toys. In one test, large amounts of bacteria—including the food-poisoning bug E. coli—were found in squeeze-top and screw-top water bottles. Over time, chemicals that leach from dirty plastic bottles can lead to conditions such as PCOS, endometriosis, and possibly breast cancer.

(Getty)

Not washing your produce

How important is it to rinse those apples you bought from the fruit stand? Pretty darn important. Ingesting the bacteria on unwashed fruits and veggies can give you food poisoning, and consuming the pesticides on some of these foods can raise your risk of serious conditions. Pesticides have been linked to diarrhea and insomnia in mild cases; in severe cases, pesticides can be responsible for conditions like increased heart rate, respiratory illness, loss of reflexes, unconsciousness, and even death. Needless to say, a good scrub is well worth the effort.

(Getty)

Not caring properly for eyelash extensions

The most frequent makeup-related reason a patient ends up in Dr. Mendelsohn’s office, he says, is due to eyelash extensions. “There are varying degrees of toxicity when the glues get into the eye.” He confirms that glue in the eye can cause mild to moderate vision impairment, but in the worst-case scenario, the glue can become embedded in the cornea and lead to “keratitis, or inflammation of the cornea, which is acutely painful and usually will not resolve on its own.” Don’t miss the hygiene habits you should never do in public.

(Getty)

Leaving in tampons for too long

The most notorious consequence of not changing your tampon frequently enough is toxic shock syndrome—a potentially life-threatening infection. The symptoms start with fever, vomiting, diarrhea, headaches. Left untreated, it can eventually lead to kidney failure or death. Luckily, it’s very rare. The chances increase if you accidentally forget to remove a tampon completely—in which case surgical removal may be necessary.

(Getty)

Using your kitchen sponge for too long

Sponges are notorious germ magnets. It’s easy to lose track of how long you’ve been reusing the same sponge, but you could be making yourself sick with the very thing that should help protect you. A dirty sponge can spread salmonella, E. coli, and Staphylococcus, among other nasty substances. In fact, the average dirty sponge may be even more toxic than your toilet. To avoid food- and sponge-borne diseases, replace them frequently. Now, find out the “healthy” hygiene habits that are actually really bad for you.

(Getty)

Never washing your hair

There are hair experts who believe that frequent washing and shampooing can damage your hair. What’s even more damaging? Neglecting to wash your hair at all, ever—even with water. First, your scalp will start to smell. Eventually, bacteria will start to collect and clog your hair follicles, which could lead to infection. Build up of oils could cause skin infections, dandruff, and yeast to develop. Eventually, without any washing at all, your hair could stop growing.

(Getty)

See Gallery

Source: Read Full Article